JUDITH JARVIS THOMSON THE TROLLEY PROBLEM PDF

You know the drill by now: A runaway trolley is careening down a track. There are five workers ahead, sure to be killed if the trolley reaches them. Do you hit the switch and kill one person, or do nothing and kill five? In addition to its primary role as a philosophical exercise, the trolley problem has been used a tool in psychology β€”and more recently, it has become the standard for asking moral questions about self-driving cars. Should an autonomous car endanger a driver over a pedestrian? What about an elderly person over a child?

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Laura D'Olimpio does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Imagine you are standing beside some tram tracks. In the distance, you spot a runaway trolley hurtling down the tracks towards five workers who cannot hear it coming. As this disaster looms, you glance down and see a lever connected to the tracks.

You realise that if you pull the lever, the tram will be diverted down a second set of tracks away from the five unsuspecting workers. This is the crux of the classic thought experiment known as the trolley dilemma, developed by philosopher Philippa Foot in and adapted by Judith Jarvis Thomson in The trolley dilemma allows us to think through the consequences of an action and consider whether its moral value is determined solely by its outcome.

The trolley dilemma has since proven itself to be a remarkably flexible tool for probing our moral intuitions, and has been adapted to apply to various other scenarios, such as war, torture, drones, abortion and euthanasia. Imagine you are standing on a footbridge above the tram tracks. However, there is large man standing next to you on the footbridge. So, would you push the man on to the tracks, sacrificing him in order to stop the tram and thereby saving five others?

The outcome of this scenario is identical to the one with the lever diverting the trolley onto another track: one person dies; five people live. The interesting thing is that, while most people would throw the lever, very few would approve of pushing the fat man off the footbridge. Thompson and other philosophers have given us other variations on the trolley dilemma that are also scarily entertaining. Imagine you are a doctor and you have five patients who all need transplants in order to live.

Two each require one lung, another two each require a kidney and the fifth needs a heart. In the next ward is another individual recovering from a broken leg. So, would you kill the healthy patient and harvest their organs to save five others?

Again, the consequences are the same as the first dilemma, but most people would utterly reject the notion of killing the healthy patient. If all the dilemmas above have the same consequence, yet most people would only be willing to throw the lever, but not push the fat man or kill the healthy patient, does that mean our moral intuitions are not always reliable, logical or consistent?

The former is active while the latter is passive. In the first trolley dilemma, the person who pulls the lever is saving the life of the five workers and letting the one person die. After all, pulling the lever does not inflict direct harm on the person on the side track. But in the footbridge scenario, pushing the fat man over the side is in intentional act of killing. Thompson offered a different perspective.

She argued that moral theories that judge the permissibility of an action based on its consequences alone, such as consequentialism or utilitarianism , cannot explain why some actions that cause killings are permissible while others are not. If we consider that everyone has equal rights, then we would be doing something wrong in sacrificing one even if our intention was to save five. Research done by neuroscientists has investigated which parts of the brain were activated when people considered the first two variations of the trolley dilemma.

They noted that the first version activates our logical, rational mind and thus if we decided to pull the lever it was because we intended to save a larger number of lives. However, when we consider pushing the bystander, our emotional reasoning becomes involved and we therefore feel differently about killing one in order to save five.

Are our emotions in this instance leading us to the correct action? Should we avoid sacrificing one, even if it is to save five? The trolley dilemma and its variations demonstrate that most people approve of some actions that cause harm, yet other actions with the same outcome are not considered permissible. Not everyone answers the dilemmas in the same way, and even when people agree, they may vary in their justification of the action they defend.

These thought experiments have been used to stimulate discussion about the difference between killing versus letting die, and have even appeared, in one form or another, in popular culture, such as the film Eye In The Sky. A woman's worth: exploring the gender divide in Pakistani culture β€” Cambridge, Cambridgeshire. York Festival of Ideas β€” York, York. Developing artificial minds: Joint attention and robotics β€” Cambridge, Cambridgeshire.

Edition: Available editions United Kingdom. Become an author Sign up as a reader Sign in Get newsletter. However, down this side track is one lone worker, just as oblivious as his colleagues. So, would you pull the lever, leading to one death but saving five?

Variations Now consider now the second variation of this dilemma. Inconsistent or are there other factors than consequences at play? Actions, intentions and consequences If all the dilemmas above have the same consequence, yet most people would only be willing to throw the lever, but not push the fat man or kill the healthy patient, does that mean our moral intuitions are not always reliable, logical or consistent?

Real world dilemmas The trolley dilemma and its variations demonstrate that most people approve of some actions that cause harm, yet other actions with the same outcome are not considered permissible. Bleecker Street Media. Philosophy Morality Ethics moral dilemma.

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Trolley problem

Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website. See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. Published on Nov 28, They talk about Philippa Foot's discussion of the "trolley driver" and "transplant" problems, as well as Thomson's discussion of "bystander at the switch" and "fat man.

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Enough With the Trolley Problem

The trolley problem is a thought experiment in ethics modeling an ethical dilemma. It is generally considered to represent a classic clash between two schools of moral thought, utilitarianism and deontological ethics. The general form of the problem is this:. There is a runaway trolley barreling down the railway tracks. Ahead, on the tracks, there are five people tied up and unable to move. The trolley is headed straight for them. You are standing some distance off in the train yard, next to a lever.

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