HOW DAVID BEATS GOLIATH MALCOLM GLADWELL PDF

The first was that he would never raise his voice. The team was made up mostly of twelve-year-olds, and twelve-year-olds, he knew from experience, did not respond well to shouting. He would conduct business on the basketball court, he decided, the same way he conducted business at his software firm. He would speak calmly and softly, and convince the girls of the wisdom of his approach with appeals to reason and common sense. The second principle was more important. He is from Mumbai.

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The first was that he would never raise his voice. The team was made up mostly of twelve-year-olds, and twelve-year-olds, he knew from experience, did not respond well to shouting. He would conduct business on the basketball court, he decided, the same way he conducted business at his software firm. He would speak calmly and softly, and convince the girls of the wisdom of his approach with appeals to reason and common sense. The second principle was more important. He is from Mumbai.

He grew up with cricket and soccer. He would never forget the first time he saw a basketball game. He thought it was mindless.

Team A would score and then immediately retreat to its own end of the court. Then the process would reverse itself. A basketball court was ninety-four feet long. But most of the time a team defended only about twenty-four feet of that, conceding the other seventy feet. But they would do it for only a few minutes at a time. Why, then, did weak teams play in a way that made it easy for good teams to do the very things that made them so good?

Morgan and Julia were serious basketball players. They were not the sort who played pickup games at the playground every evening. These were the daughters of computer programmers and people with graduate degrees. They worked on science projects, and read books, and went on ski vacations with their parents, and dreamed about growing up to be marine biologists. He was not one to accept losing easily. His second principle, then, was that his team would play a real full-court press, every game, all the time.

The team ended up at the national championships. It was not. Davids win all the time. The Goliaths, he found, won in That is a remarkable fact. In the Biblical story of David and Goliath, David initially put on a coat of mail and a brass helmet and girded himself with a sword: he prepared to wage a conventional battle of swords against Goliath.

But then he stopped. He went back and re-analyzed his data. Consider the way T. The British were helping the Arabs in their uprising, and the initial focus was Medina, the city at the end of a long railroad that the Turks had built, running south from Damascus and down through the Hejaz desert.

The Turks had amassed a large force in Medina, and the British leadership wanted Lawrence to gather the Arabs and destroy the Turkish garrison there, before the Turks could threaten the entire region. But when Lawrence looked at his ragtag band of Bedouin fighters he realized that a direct attack on Medina would never succeed. And why did taking the city matter, anyway? Instead of attacking the Turks at their point of strength, Lawrence reasoned, he ought to attack them where they were weak—along the vast, largely unguarded length of railway line that was their connection to Damascus.

Instead of focussing his attention on Medina, he should wage war over the broadest territory possible. They were nomads. The typical Bedouin soldier carried no more than a rifle, a hundred rounds of ammunition, forty-five pounds of flour, and a pint of drinking water, which meant that he could travel as much as a hundred and ten miles a day across the desert, even in summer. In one typical stretch, in the spring of , his men dynamited sixty rails and cut a telegraph line at Buair on March 24th, sabotaged a train and twenty-five rails at Abu al-Naam on March 25th, dynamited fifteen rails and cut a telegraph line at Istabl Antar on March 27th, raided a Turkish garrison and derailed a train on March 29th, returned to Buair and sabotaged the railway line again on March 31st, dynamited eleven rails at Hediah on April 3rd, raided the train line in the area of Wadi Dhaiji on April 4th and 5th, and attacked twice on April 6th.

The Turks expected an attack from British ships patrolling the waters of the Gulf of Aqaba to the west. Lawrence decided to attack from the east instead, coming at the city from the unprotected desert, and to do that he led his men on an audacious, six-hundred-mile loop—up from the Hejaz, north into the Syrian desert, and then back down toward Aqaba.

This was in summer, through some of the most inhospitable land in the Middle East, and Lawrence tacked on a side trip to the outskirts of Damascus, in order to mislead the Turks about his intentions. We could not lightly draw water after dark, for there were snakes swimming in the pools or clustering in knots around their brinks. Twice puff-adders came twisting into the alert ring of our debating coffee-circle.

Three of our men died of bites; four recovered after great fear and pain, and a swelling of the poisoned limb. Howeitat treatment was to bind up the part with snake-skin plaster and read chapters of the Koran to the sufferer until he died.

The Turks simply did not think that their opponent would be mad enough to come at them from the desert. David can beat Goliath by substituting effort for ability—and substituting effort for ability turns out to be a winning formula for underdogs in all walks of life, including little blond-haired girls on the basketball court. Wall Street used to be the same way. The information on which a trader based his decisions was scattered across a number of databases.

The trader would collect information from here and there, collate and analyze it, and then make a trade. Batch processing was replaced by real-time processing. The shift, to his mind, is one of kind, not just of degree. There are passenger systems that know where the passenger is. The lag is why you had to wait, fruitlessly, at baggage claim. The lag is why you vow never to fly that airline again.

The world runs in real time, but government runs in batch. Every few months, it adjusts. You can imagine what someone like Alan Greenspan or Ben Bernanke might say about that idea. Such people are powerfully invested in the notion of the Fed as a Solomonic body: that pause of five or eight weeks between economic adjustments seems central to the process of deliberation.

A professional basketball game was forty-eight minutes long, divided up into alternating possessions of roughly twenty seconds: back and forth, back and forth.

But a good half of each twenty-second increment was typically taken up with preliminaries and formalities. The point guard dribbled the ball up the court. He called out a play that the team had choreographed a hundred times in practice.

It was only then that the defending team sprang into action, actively contesting each pass and shot. It was as formal and as convention-bound as an eighteenth-century quadrille. The supporters of that dance said that the defensive players had to run back to their own end, in order to compose themselves for the arrival of the other team.

But the reason they had to compose themselves, surely, was that by retreating they allowed the offense to execute a play that it had practiced to perfection. Basketball was batch! Insurgents, though, operate in real time. Lawrence hit the Turks, in that stretch in the spring of , nearly every day, because he knew that the more he accelerated the pace of combat the more the war became a battle of endurance—and endurance battles favor the insurgent.

But the first sentence matters just as much. David broke the rhythm of the encounter. He speeded it up. As a football player, Craig was legendary for the off-season hill workouts he put himself through. Most of his N. He has run seven marathons. The girls loved Rometra. The first is the inbounds pass. When one team scores, a player from the other team takes the ball out of bounds and has five seconds to pass it to a teammate on the court.

If that deadline is missed, the ball goes to the other team. They run back to their own end. Redwood City did not. Each girl on the team closely shadowed her counterpart. The Redwood City girls, by contrast, played in front of their opponents, to prevent them from catching the inbounds pass in the first place.

Why bother? A smaller court. A five-second deadline. A heavier, bigger ball. Or the inbounding player, panicked by the thought that her five seconds were about to be up, would throw the ball away. Or her pass would be intercepted by one of the Redwood City players. Anjali was the designated trapper. Maybe the other player would throw it away in a panic—or get bottled up and stalled, so that the ref would end up blowing the whistle.

We would press and steal, and do that over and over again. It made people so nervous. There were teams that were a lot better than us, that had been playing a long time, and we would beat them. The Redwood City players would jump ahead 4—0, 6—0, 8—0, 12—0. One time, they led 25—0. They shot layups.

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Malcolm Gladwell: How David Beats Goliath

Improve your training, nutrition and lifestyle with daily. Using examples from the Bible David vs. National Junior Basketball team made up of year-old girls , New Yorker author Malcolm Gladwell spins a spirited yarn about how and when effort can trump ability. Gladwell writes, "David can beat Goliath by substituting effort for ability—and substituting effort for ability turns out to be a winning formula for underdogs in all walks of life, including little blond-haired girls on the basketball court.

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“How David Beats Goliath” by Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell is one of our favorite modern authors. So imagine our excitement when we read this article in The New Yorker. In it Gladwell uses our favorite sport — basketball — to show that underdogs win by being willing to break from what is expected and, basically, do hard things. He tells the story of a seventh-grade girls basketball team that chose to make up for a lack of skill with hard work — instituting a real full-court press every time down the court.

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How David Beats Goliath

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